Talia Ilan

conductor
biography
Talia Ilan - Born in Tel Aviv (Israel),1971. Music Director of the "Israel Stage Orchestra", Music Director of the "Campus" Symphony Orchestra Ramat Hasharon, Guest conductor with The Israel Chamber Orchestra, The Israel Sinfonietta Be'er Sheva, The New Haifa Symphony Orchestra, the Ashdod Symphony Orchestra and the Ra'anana Symphonette Orchestra. Conductor of the "Reflex" ensemble of contemporary music (NY – Tel Aviv).
Graduated from the Jerusalem Rubin Academy (M.Mus and Artist Diploma) majoring in Orchestral Conducting under the guidanceof Prof. Mendi Rodan. She was invited to study with Maestro Daniel Barenboim in Berlin Staatsoper Unter den Linden and with Michael Tilson Thomas in The London Symphony Orchestra, New world Symphony Orchestra (Miami), etc. Awarded Best Conductor at the competition with the Janáček Philharmonic, Ostrava (Czech Republic), Sept. 2000 and with the Moravian Philharmonic, Olomouc (Czech Republic), Sept. 2001. Invited as a conductor for the Ischia Music Festival (Italy), 2007, Macao Orchestra (China) 2009, Qingdao Symphony Orchestra (China), 2015. Recording new music for the Israeli classical music radio channel. Talia holds the conducting Teaching position at the Ono Academic College. 

Talia is married to Yi-An Xu , and they have two daughters - Noya (born August 2010) and Shira Beatriz (born 12.10.14)

register as a fan for free
Register as a fan of "Talia Ilan " and get the latest news via E-Mail.
 
 
 
 
register as a fan
After sending your data you will get an E-Mail where you can accept your subscription.

Short Profile

NameIlan, Talia
Date of Birth1971-10-19
Born inIsrael, Asia
Home LocationTel Aviv, Israel
Main languageHebrew
Additional languages English,  Spanish; Castilian 
attended UniversitiesTel Aviv University, Jerusalem University
Reviews
Too many conductors in the kitchen
2015-11-15 Jerusalem Post Newspaper, Jerusalem
"There is a famous story about Zubin Mehta. Once, in the middle of a concert at a major European venue, there was a power outage.
For several minutes, enveloped in complete darkness, the musicians continued to play. When the lights came back on, Mehta was standing on his podium, conducting as usual.
"The players know the music by heart. When they were left in the dark, they couldn't see Mehta. So, if they can play without seeing him, why do they need a conductor at all?" asks Yi-An Xu.

Seated next to his wife, conductor Talia Ilan, Xu speaks quickly, attempting to get his point across. For the better part of an hour, over coffee and juice, Xu and Ilan have finished one another's sentences, cut each other off and laughed about their long-standing disagreements.

The anecdote, which Xu tells with great lightness, represents a thorn in the successful conductor's side, a notion that has nagged at him for years. Though his and Ilan's life's work is devoted to conducting and composing music, Xu can't help but question the place of the conductor. Being critical about the position undoubtedly makes each conductor stronger. These two take nothing for granted and are clearly, wholly engaged in a never-ending dialogue about music, artistry and life.

"You see posters for concerts and the name of the conductor is by far the biggest, then, underneath it, in smaller print is the name of the composer," adds Ilan. "This is totally off, in my opinion."

"I have a lot of doubts about whether the job of the conductor should be the most important one to talk about. The composer is the great one; the score is the great thing.

The conductor is not even as important as any individual player in the orchestra," says Xu. Xu, 36, was born and raised in China. His family moved to Australia for several years before returning o Shanghai...
"
(ORI J. LENKINSKI)
view original article
share on facebook
Talia llan propone “Volar con la música”
2016-11-17 Aurora Newspaper (Spanish), Tel Aviv
"

La orquesta Habamáabre la temporada y ofrece una serie de 6 conciertos para toda la familia que combinan el teatro, la música clásica con el circo y la danza. Esta orquesta celebra su 21ª temporada con conciertos dirigidos por Talia Ilan y Roni Porat. La "Tizmoret Habama", es conocida por la revolución que causó en esta área sin perder calidad y es un estilo que comenzó con Roni Porat, que fue su fundador y ahora continúa con Talia.
Porat y Talia, ponen en escena el estilo que combina la música con el teatro, pero no sólo eso, sino que los músicos de la orquesta también participan activamente en todo y se convierten de músicos en actores, bailarines y cantantes. También el conductor es parte de este plan. El objetivo es proporcionar a los jóvenes espectadores el hábito de escuchar música clásica, desde una edad temprana, y con placer e interés. La orquesta acoge jóvenes artistas israelíes: músicos, cantantes, actores y coros. Más allá de sus dotes musicales los presenta en el escenario en toda su teatralidad.
Los conciertos mostrarán los sonidos de la cocina de Rossini, clásico de siempre como el Lago de los Cisnes, un encuentro cómico-musical "la banda se muere de risa" y más. Los conciertos se llevará a cabo en el Museo de Tel Aviv de Arte y la entrada incluye la visita al museo lo cual permite continuar el entretenimiento familiar antes y después del espectáculo.
La temporada se abre el 19.11 con "El Lago de los Cisnes". Es la historia de la maldición de la princesa Odette que la bruja convirtió en cisne y el apuesto príncipe Siegfried, heredero del reino, no puede casarse porque el amor no llega. Todo cobra vida en esta pieza de ballet de Tchaikovsky arreglada para toda

"
(Chiquita Levov)
view original article
share on facebook
Baton Rouge: What do you call a woman conductor? Meet Talia Ilan, who likes to be called neither 'maestro' nor 'maestra.'
2013-04-18 Haaretz Magazine, http://www.haaretz.com, Tel Aviv
"

If a male conductor is called "maestro," are you called "maestra"?
Talia Ilan: "Some people do call me that, but I don't like the title, and my husband doesn't like being called 'maestro.' All it means is 'teacher,' but conductors use it in order to create distance and a sense of superiority relative to the orchestra and the audience. I don't feel superior to the musicians or the audience. The way I see my work, I feel that first of all I've come to serve the music and not ourselves, and therefore we aren't more important than the musicians. Our job is to mediate between the music and the audience, via the orchestra. My husband and I don't place ourselves above anything."

So what do you prefer to be called? "Sweetheart"? After all, you're also a blonde.

"Certainly not 'sweetheart,' maybe Talia, or at most Ms. Ilan."

Born in Tel Aviv, Talia Ilan is currently one of only two female Israeli orchestra conductors, if you don't include Prof. Dalia Atlas, the oldest and most respected, who is far older and therefore can justifiably be considered the first Israeli female conductor. Atlas paved the way already in the 1960s. Older readers may remember her conducting the Haifa Symphony Orchestra ‏(whose director was Maestro Sergiu Comissiona‏) while dressed in a tailored men's suit.

In the dozens of articles written about Atlas, who also attained international success, there was always a discussion of the great wonder − how was it possible that she was both a woman and an orchestra conductor? Because yes, in the context of men's small contribution to the history of humanity and the development of civilization, along with their achievements in battle, their design of enormous buildings and their trivial inventions such as electricity and telephones, their decisive and almost exclusive contribution to the world of classical music is evident, both in composition and even more so in conducting. Atlas paved the way, but no
"

(Neri Livneh)
view original article
share on facebook
Information
 
OK